Latest Research in Women's Health

doctor or scientist explains to patient

Why We Focus Research on Women

Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in women, killing one woman about every 80 seconds.

Such an aggressive disease requires an equally aggressive response.

That’s why the American Heart Association has invested more than $4.6 billion in research that:

  • Increases our knowledge and understanding about heart disease and stroke; and
  • Makes the association the largest funder of heart disease and stroke research, second only to the U.S. government.

Doctors rely on research to inform the work they do to help you — the patient — prevent and treat heart disease and stroke.

There has been progress, but in 2020, only 38% of clinical trial participants are women. We’re working every day to change that number.

There are significant biological differences between men and women, and research should reflect those differences. That’s why the AHA is committed to funding research focused on women.


There are significant biological differences between men and women, and research should reflect those differences.

woman signs medical consent form

You Can Make a Difference - Join Research Goes Red and contribute to women’s health research

The American Heart Association's Go Red for Women® movement and Verily's Project Baseline have joined forces to call on women across the United States to contribute to health research through Research Goes Red.

We aim to empower women to help us develop the world’s most engaged registry and research platform for women. Together, we can unlock the power of science to find new ways to treat, beat and prevent heart disease in all women.

Learn more or join Research Goes Red

Latest Research

Research Takes Deep Dive Into Women’s Health

Four collaborative projects researching heart disease in women will focus on fasting, meditation, estrogen levels and the psychology of exercise.

Cardiovascular Risk Linked to Mental Function

Cardiovascular risk factors as a young adult may influence your chance of staying mentally sharp in mid-life, according to new research from the American Heart Association.

Insomnia May Significantly Raise Stroke Risk

The risk of stroke may be much higher in people with insomnia compared to those who don’t have trouble sleeping, according to new research.

Anxiety Linked to Long-Term Stroke Risk

The greater the anxiety level, the higher risk of having a stroke, according to new research from the AHA. Learn stress management strategies to help cope with your stress.

Children’s Cardiovascular Fitness Declining

Research shows children's cardiovascular fitness declining worldwide. Learn more about what impacts children's cardiovascular health and ways to keep your family heart healthy.

Heart Disease Causes Pregnancy-Related Deaths

Heart disease is the leading cause of women’s pregnancy-related deaths in California — but nearly one-third could be prevented, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2013.

Environmental Toxins, Heart Risk in Children

Children’s congenital heart defects may be associated with their mothers’ exposure to specific mixtures of environmental toxins during pregnancy, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2013.

Exercise Could Lower High Blood Pressure Risk

New research from the American Heart Association shows exercising more than four hours per week can lower your blood pressure by up to 19 percent.

Positive Patients Exercise, Live Longer

Heart disease patients with positive attitudes are likely to exercise and live longer, according to new research.